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5 Myths and Facts About Co-Parenting

When you’re getting a divorce, you may have a lot of questions pertaining to your kid’s well-being during the separation period and after the divorce is final. One thing is certain, child custody cases and co-parenting are complex subjects and every family’s situation is unique.

There are myths surrounding child custody, co-parenting, and divorce that could potentially hinder you from seeing success during your custody case or with an existing custody agreement. However, a skilled and knowledgeable child custody attorney can provide you with correct information about your specific case and how you can successfully navigate through co-parenting.

These myths about co-parenting can be debunked with a little research from a factual source, starting with this blog by Fait & DiLima, LLP.

Myth #1: The Child Always Goes With the Mom

Most of the time during a custody case, families may assume that during a divorce, that mothers always get primary custody. This isn’t always the case. In Maryland, child custody is categorized into different types, called legal and physical custody, and joint or shared custody.

There are several factors that can determine which parent your child is primarily with. But, a judge in your case will always make a decision based on what is in your child’s best interests above any other factors you may argue in your case.

Myth #2: Parents Shouldn’t Discuss Divorce With Their Kids

Naturally, as a parent you want your kids to feel protected or shielded from certain information or details about your relationship and divorce. It’s normal to try to keep your kids as stress-free as possible during your divorce, however, it’s important to have a conversation with them about your co-parenting relationship after the fact.

Of course, you want to avoid divulging details surrounding your divorce but you should explain your new role as a co-parent and how it will affect your child in the future. Your child may have questions about co-parenting and child custody, so you can rely on our client tool kit on our site to help you understand and explain custody and co-parenting.

Myth #3: Visitation Can Be Denied By A Parent Without Going to Court

As hard as co-parenting may be, parents can’t deny each other visitation rights if there is an existing custody agreement in place. You and your ex are both required to follow the custody agreement that was given to you by a judge.

In some cases, you may feel like your ex isn’t doing as much as they should as a co-parent. But if you and your ex don’t agree with your custody agreement and parenting plan, then you can seek modifications for different reasons, like if your ex doesn’t abide by your custody agreement.

Myth #4: Your Ex Doesn’t Have to Pay Child Support With Joint Custody

The type of custody agreement you have does not determine whether or not your ex pays child support during your separation or after your divorce. In Maryland, child support is determined by both parent’s ability to provide for their child.

This includes both of your ability to provide for their basic needs, like:

  • Healthcare.
  • Education.
  • Daily expenses.

As co-parents, you and your ex should have a conversation with your attorneys about how you can agree on providing your child’s basic financial support.

Myth #5: You Don’t Need an Attorney for a Custody Agreement

While you could very well discuss a co-parenting agreement with your ex, for more complicated situations, hiring an experienced family attorney is the best route to take. Our team at Fait & DiLima, LLP has helped parents come to an agreement that works best for their children and their unique situation. We can negotiate your custody agreement, file paperwork, and create an agreement that you feel secure with and will hold up in court.

Contact Fait & DiLima, LLP today to schedule an initial consultation and discuss your custody options at (301) 888-6384!

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